Looking for a South Jordan Asphalt Sealing company?

At A-Rock Asphalt Services, we’re proud to serve as your one-stop hub for all asphalt paving services in South Jordan, Utah and surrounding areas. We’ve been assisting Utahns with all their asphalt needs for years, with a huge variety of services available from the most experienced pros in the business.

Whether you require minor asphalt repairs or re-striping, newly-paved lots or surfaces or a variety of coating and sealing solutions, we’re here to help. Consult with our team to learn about not only our previous work and examples of our craftsmanship, but also precisely how we can serve you and help build or repair your asphalt surfaces.

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Specializing in medium and small paving jobs

Dedicated Asphalt Professionals

When you call the team at A-Rock Asphalt, your experience will be handled from start to finish by friendly, experienced professionals dedicated to your satisfaction. We only hire the very best, with a rigorous screening and training process involved for all new hires that ensures only trustworthy professionals will be working on your property.

From here, we also ensure all our asphalt technicians are fully licensed and insured before allowing them to work. We also offer a clear, honest pricing structure for all our services, transparency that’s helped us build numerous long-lasting relationships with business owners throughout the state, who return to us for all their asphalt needs.

Free, No-Obligation Consultation

For those who have not taken advantage of our services in the past, or even for repeat clients requiring different services this time around, we’re happy to offer free, no-obligation consultations. We’ll discuss your asphalt needs in detail, plus your budget, and offer you specific estimates on cost, timeline and other important facts. As we noted, such consultation comes with absolutely no obligation you purchase services.

Our Varied Services

We offer several asphalt services to all our clients:

  • Paving: From small surfaces to full-on parking lots.
  • Striping: We’ll handle any line or marking striping needs for your lot.
  • Coating and sealing: We offer high-quality protective coatings and seals to limit risks of damage, moisture seepage and other problems.
  • Patching: In cases of asphalt damage, we’ll repair it quickly and affordably.
  • Concrete: We also offer several varied concrete services for clients in need – ask about the specifics of these services if you require them.

For more on any of our asphalt paving services in Murray, Utah or nearby areas, speak to the staff at A-Rock Asphalt Services today.

What Our Clients Say

About Asphalt Sealing

Asphalt Sealing, or sealcoating, is simply the process of laying a thin protective layer over asphalt-based pavement to give it a protective layer of protection against the elements: oil, water, and U.V. The positive effects of asphalt sealing have long been debated. Some claim that asphalt sealing increases the lifespan of the pavement, but again, there’s no evidence that backs up those claims. In fact, asphalt sealing can actually damage the pavement by creating cracks. The excessive water and oil that can be soaked into the asphalt also weaken its structural integrity. And, the chemical fumes emitted during asphalt sealing can also be harmful to humans.

With all of that in mind, it’s not surprising that a lot of business owners, when they set out to perform asphalt sealing, opt to go the non-per square foot route. For one thing, the costs are much lower, often no more than a few cents per square foot. And, the benefits of lower cost and improved performance are well-known. After all, if you want to save money, you want to reduce your operation costs, right?

But that brings us to our next question: Are asphalt sealing pads a good solution for parking lots, blacktop driveways, or other paved surfaces? As with any typical maintenance procedure, regular maintenance is the best way to reduce the cost of asphalt sealing. Sealing at least annually, will help keep dust, pollen, and other pollutants from making their way onto your paved surfaces. It will also help protect your driveway from water damage, as well as mold and algae growth, both of which cause a lot of problems to homeowners.

Now let’s take a look at how often you should reseal your asphalt surfaces, especially if you’re going to go the non-per square foot route. The key, again, is regular maintenance. And as it turns out, the best time to perform asphalt sealing and resealing is during the cold winter months. In fact, there’s even been some recent evidence suggesting that the best time for asphalt sealing and resealing is during the fall, when temperatures are quite low.

Why is that? It’s because fall is when most asphalt-based park finishes and protective coatings need to be applied. Asphalt-based park finishes are very weather-resistant, but that doesn’t mean that they’re impervious to the elements. In fact, the rainy spring weather can still cause problems, as can heavy snow, ice, and even dew. So, by applying the protective coatings only during the wet winter months, you’ll be doing your park and business no favors, and in the end, your asphalt sealing and resealing efforts will be wasted.

Here’s why: Asphalt seal coats are extremely dense. Think about asphalt sealing and resealing – it’s the same product, just in a different form. And, that means that you have to apply a lot less of it to achieve the same degree of protection. That’s why a lot of asphalt maintenance and repair companies (which specialize in asphalt sealing and resealing) will advise you to apply a minimum of three or four gallons of asphalt-base protectant per square foot of paved area. In other words, if you have a parking lot of ten thousand square feet, you’d want to apply three gallons per every twenty-five feet of paved area.

If you were to apply that kind of service to your own asphalt driveway, you could expect to pay anywhere from three to five dollars per square foot. Now consider that the average cost of asphalt sealing and resealing is only about two or three dollars per square foot. Multiply those two by the number of feet of asphalt you’re going to need to cover (per your parking lot, for example), and you quickly come to understand how much asphalt sealing and resealing would cost you. Applying the service yourself would cost you at least a thousand dollars or more. Not very appealing, I’d say.

But, don’t give up just yet – there are other ways to protect your asphalt driveway sealcoating and resealing investment, and they won’t cost you nearly as much, so don’t rule them out just yet. One of those ways is called flashings, which are like raised bumps along the edge of your driveway that will serve as an additional traction aid when you drive over it. The average cost of installing these would be about two hundred dollars, with the total installed cost running into the thousands. Another less expensive alternative is a thin film of asphalt seal coating that has a plastic protective layer between it and the ground, as opposed to flashing. It’s about as thick as standard asphalt, which would then have to be applied to your asphalt driveway sealcoating and resurfacing project in much the same way.

Asphalt Sealing South Jordan UT

About South Jordan, Utah

The first known inhabitants were members of the Desert Archaic Culture who were nomadic hunter-gatherers. From 400 A.D. to around 1350 A.D., the Fremont people settled into villages and farmed corn and squash. Changes in climatic conditions to a cooler, drier period and the movement into the area of ancestors of the Ute, Paiute, and Shoshone, led to the disappearance of the Fremont people. When European settlers arrived, there were no permanent Native American settlements in the Salt Lake Valley, but the area bordered several tribes – the territory of the Northwestern Shoshone to the north, the Timpanogots band of the Utes to the south in Utah Valley, and the Goshutes to the west in Tooele Valley.

The only recorded trapper to lead a party through the area was Étienne Provost, a French Canadian. In October 1824, Provost's party was lured into an Indian camp somewhere along the Jordan River north of Utah Lake. The people responsible for the attack were planning revenge against Provost's party for an earlier unexplained incident involving other trappers. Provost escaped, but his men were caught off-guard and fifteen of them were killed.

On July 22, 1847, an advanced party of the first Mormon pioneers entered the valley and immediately began to irrigate land and explore the area with a view to establishing new settlements. Alexander Beckstead, a blacksmith from Ontario, Canada, moved his family to the West Jordan area in 1849, and became the first of his trade in the south Salt Lake Valley. He helped dig the first ditch to divert water from the Jordan River, powering Archibald Gardner's flour mill. In 1859, Beckstead became the first settler of South Jordan by moving his family along the Jordan River where they lived in a dugout cut into the west bluffs above the river. The flood plain of the Jordan was level, and could be cleared for farming if a ditch was constructed to divert river water along the base of the west bluff. Beckstead and others created the 2.5-mile (4.0 km) "Beckstead Ditch", parts of which are still in use as of 2010.

In 1863, the South Jordan LDS Branch was organized as a branch of the West Jordan Ward, giving South Jordan its name. The Branch consisted of just nine families. A school was built in 1864 out of adobe and also served as the LDS Meetinghouse for the South Jordan Branch. As South Jordan grew, a new and larger building was constructed in 1873 on the east side of the site of the present-day cemetery. It had an upper and lower entrance with a granite foundation using left-over materials brought from the granite quarry at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. The upper story was made of oversized adobe bricks. The main hall had curtains which could be pulled to section off the hall for classes. The meetinghouse also served as the "ward" school when it was held during the fall and winter months. It came to be known as the "Mud Temple", and was in use until 1908.

In 1876, work was completed on the South Jordan Canal which took water out of the Jordan River in Bluffdale and brought it above the river bluffs for the first time. As a result of the new canal, most of the families moved up away from the river onto the "flats" above the river which they could now irrigate. In 1881, the Utah and Salt Lake Canal was completed. It runs parallels to the west side of today's Redwood Road. With the completion of the canal system, greater acreage could be farmed, which led to the area's population increasing.

In the late 1890s, alfalfa hay was introduced and took the place of tougher native grasses which had been used up to that point for feed for livestock. In good years, alfalfa could produce three crops that were stored for winter. Sugar beets were introduced to South Jordan around 1910. Farmers liked sugar beets because they could be sold for cash at the Utah-Idaho Sugar Company factory in West Jordan. Sugar beet farming became so integral to the region, that the region's high school (Jordan High School) mascot was named the "beetdigger".

A big celebration was held on January 14, 1914, to commemorate the arrival of electrical power, the addition of a water tank and supply system for indoor pumping and a new park for South Jordan. By the 1930s, the area needed a water tank to store water for residents living further west. The only way to get a federal grant was to incorporate and become a city. Citizens voted to incorporate on November 8, 1935, and immediately issued bonds to obtain money for the water tank. The city was initially governed by a Town Board with responsibilities over parks, water and the cemetery. In 1978, the city moved to a mayor-council form of government and assumed local supervision of police, fire, road and building inspections from Salt Lake County.

One of the worst school bus accidents in United States history occurred on December 1, 1938. A bus loaded with 38 students from South Jordan, Riverton, and Bluffdale crossed in front of an oncoming train that was obscured by fog and snow. The bus was broadsided killing the bus driver and 23 students. The concern about bus safety from the South Jordan accident led to changes in state and eventually federal law mandating that buses stop and open the doors before proceeding into a railroad crossing. The same railroad crossing was the site of many other crashes in the following years with the last deadly crash occurring on December 31, 1995, when three teens died while crossing the tracks in their car. The crossing was finally closed, but not until crashes occurred in 1997 and 2002.

In 1950, Salt Lake County had 489,000 acres (198,000 ha) devoted to farming. But by 1992, due to increasing population, land devoted to farming had decreased to 108,000 acres (44,000 ha). As a result of this urbanization, South Jordan's economy went from agrarian to being a bedroom community of Salt Lake City. Kennecott Land began a development in 2004 called Daybreak, which is a 4,000-acre (1,600 ha) planned community that will contain more than 20,000 homes and includes commercial and retail space. In 1981, the LDS Jordan River Utah Temple was completed. In 2009, the LDS Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple was completed and became the second temple to be built in South Jordan. South Jordan is the first city in the world to have two LDS Temples, Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple and the Jordan River Utah Temple, the second city being Provo, Utah.

According to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2017, there were 70,954 people in South Jordan. The racial makeup of the county was 87.4% non-Hispanic White, 0.9% Black, 0.2% Native American, 3.4% Asian, 0.6% Pacific Islander, and 2.5% from two or more races. 5.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

As of the 2010 census, there were 50,418 people residing in 14,333 households. The population density was 2,278 people per square mile (880/km2). There were 14,943 housing units at an average density of 675.3 per square mile (260.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.5% White, 0.2% African American, 0.2% Native American, 2.6% Asian, 0.9% Pacific Islander, and 2.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.0% of the population. The racial makeup of Salt Lake County was 81.2% White, 1.6% African American, 0.9% Native American, 3.1% Asian, 1.4% Pacific Islander, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic of any race was 16.4%. The racial makeup of Utah was 92.9% White, 1.3% African American, 1.4% Native American, 3.3% Asian, 1.5% Pacific Islander, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic of any race was 17.1%.

There were 14,433 households, out of which 46.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 76.5% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.1% were non-families. 11.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.83 compared to 2.94 for Salt Lake County and 3.03 for Utah.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 37.8% under the age of 20, 6.0% from 20 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 7.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29.9 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $99,856, Salt Lake County was $58,004 and Utah was $56,330. Males had a median income of $65,722 versus $41,171 for females. The per capita income for the city was $36,125. About 1.6% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.7% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over. In Salt Lake County, 10.3% of the population were below the poverty line and 10.8% of the population in Utah was below the poverty line. Of those people 25 years and older in the city, 96.8% were high school graduates compared to 86.8% in Salt Lake County and 87.7% in Utah. Those attaining a college degree were 41.2% of South Jordan's population.

There were 22,368 people employed over the age of 16 with 17,258 people working in the private sector, 2,744 in the government sector, 1,186 self-employed and 32 unpaid family workers. The mean travel time to work was 23.8 minutes. There were 4,153 people employed in educational services, health care and social assistance. There were 2,862 people employed in professional, scientific, management, administrative and waste management services. There were 2,420 people employed in finance, insurance, real estate and rental and leasing. There were 2,316 people employed in retail trade, 1,633 in construction and 2,050 in manufacturing.

For the year 2010, the city had 27 violent crimes reported to law enforcement, and 1,050 reports of property crimes. The violent crime rate was 48 per 100,000 people compared to a national average of 404 and 213 for Utah. The property crime rate was 1,858 per 100,000 compared to a national rate of 2,942 and 3,180 for the State. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) defines violent offenses to include forcible rape, robbery, murder, non-negligent manslaughter, and aggravated assault. Property crimes are defined to include arson, motor vehicle theft, larceny, and burglary.

Statistics published by the Utah Department of Public Safety's Bureau of Criminal Identification showed a steady trend in the South Jordan crime rate between 2000 and 2008. The rate for index crimes, a group comprising the combined violent offenses and property crimes stated above, was 2,269 per 100,000 in 2000 and 2,277 per 100,000 in 2008. The 2008 rate for index crimes in Salt Lake County was 5,290 per 100,000 and 3,529 per 100,000 for the entire State of Utah.

In 2010, South Jordan had a total of 57 total law enforcement employees for a rate of 1.13 employees per 1,000 residents. City police officers made a total of 910 arrests. Total crimes reported were 3,810. Total crimes contain 22 categories that include everything from murder, rape and assault to drug offenses, larceny and prostitution.

Former resident Apolo Anton Ohno was a short track speed skating athlete. Ohno is the most decorated American Winter Olympic athlete of all time with eight medals. Current resident Edward J. Fraughton is a sculptor of western themes and inventor. Fraughton invented technology used in Automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B). ADS-B is used for tracking and finding aircraft positions using satellites.

Denise Parker is a former resident who is a three-time Summer Olympic competitor in archery. Parker was the youngest member of the 1988 U.S Summer Olympic team at age 14 where she won a bronze medal. As of 2010, Parker is Chief Executive Officer for USA Archery, the national governing body for the sport of archery.

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