Looking for a Sandy Asphalt Repair company?

At A-Rock Asphalt Services, we’re proud to serve as your one-stop hub for all asphalt paving services in Sandy, Utah and surrounding areas. We’ve been assisting Utahns with all their asphalt needs for years, with a huge variety of services available from the most experienced pros in the business.

Whether you require minor asphalt repairs or re-striping, newly-paved lots or surfaces or a variety of coating and sealing solutions, we’re here to help. Consult with our team to learn about not only our previous work and examples of our craftsmanship, but also precisely how we can serve you and help build or repair your asphalt surfaces.

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Specializing in medium and small paving jobs

Dedicated Asphalt Professionals

When you call the team at A-Rock Asphalt, your experience will be handled from start to finish by friendly, experienced professionals dedicated to your satisfaction. We only hire the very best, with a rigorous screening and training process involved for all new hires that ensures only trustworthy professionals will be working on your property.

From here, we also ensure all our asphalt technicians are fully licensed and insured before allowing them to work. We also offer a clear, honest pricing structure for all our services, transparency that’s helped us build numerous long-lasting relationships with business owners throughout the state, who return to us for all their asphalt needs.

Free, No-Obligation Consultation

For those who have not taken advantage of our services in the past, or even for repeat clients requiring different services this time around, we’re happy to offer free, no-obligation consultations. We’ll discuss your asphalt needs in detail, plus your budget, and offer you specific estimates on cost, timeline and other important facts. As we noted, such consultation comes with absolutely no obligation you purchase services.

Our Varied Services

We offer several asphalt services to all our clients:

  • Paving: From small surfaces to full-on parking lots.
  • Striping: We’ll handle any line or marking striping needs for your lot.
  • Coating and sealing: We offer high-quality protective coatings and seals to limit risks of damage, moisture seepage and other problems.
  • Patching: In cases of asphalt damage, we’ll repair it quickly and affordably.
  • Concrete: We also offer several varied concrete services for clients in need – ask about the specifics of these services if you require them.

For more on any of our asphalt paving services in Murray, Utah or nearby areas, speak to the staff at A-Rock Asphalt Services today.

What Our Clients Say

About Asphalt Repair

Whether you have asphalt and concrete pavement repair needs, there are several things you should consider before making the investment. The process can be very complicated and expensive, if not performed correctly. It is essential to choose the right contractor for your asphalt repair needs.

The first thing to consider is whether or not your asphalt repair is commercial grade. Some asphalt repair businesses are only equipped to handle residential asphalt repairs. This may result in a higher price for your repair project.

Next, you should check out any credentials of the potential contractor. A legitimate asphalt repair company will be required to obtain a business license from the local government. They will also need to pass a background and fire hazard inspection. All employees should be properly trained and insured. These factors alone should give you enough information to determine if the asphalt repair company you are considering has the ability to complete your repair request.

Another important factor to consider when choosing an asphalt repair company is their price. Not all companies are created equal. You may be eligible for discounts and incentives. Before making final decisions on which asphalt repair company you want to hire, ask for cost estimates. If a price is quoted without the customer’s permission, you should question why they are quoting that amount. Sometimes companies give quotes without customers’ permission in order to get paid quickly for the job.

If you are in the market for asphalt repairs, you may be wondering what type of maintenance you will need to do once the job is complete. Most asphalt repair jobs are fairly simple. Repairs such as potholes should be tackled using asphalt patching materials. For larger defects, such as cracks, water damage, and other issues, it is common for the asphalt repair company to use some type of filler material to repair the problem area. This process can take several days to a week, depending on the severity of the issue.

In most cases, repairing asphalt damages is not only faster than removing them, but also less expensive. The reason for this is because asphalt repairs can be completed with the least amount of materials, as compared to other types of repairs. When it comes to other types of repair, such as for potholes and cracks, it is common to have to remove and replace damaged asphalt, as well as apply additional materials. Not only does this cost more, but also it is possible for problems to become worse before they get better.

In many cases, you may be able to get a refund or credit card offer for the cost of the repair, especially if you were not able to complete the repair on your own. With an asphalt repair company, there is a good chance that you will be able to recoup at least a portion of your investment. This is because most asphalt repair companies charge their clients based on the amount of damage. In the case of damages that are severe enough to require replacement, a company may offer their clients to either pay for the cost of having the asphalt replaced or to have the asphalt repaired so that it can be used again. However, some companies offer their customers the choice of having the damaged asphalt repaired for free, depending on the circumstances.

If you are dealing with asphalt repairs, but the damage is minor, you should be able to fix the problem yourself. There are a number of ways to fix small damage such as potholes and cracks, using sandpaper to smooth out the surface, and filling them with a filler such as dry compound. If the damage is more severe, you may need the help of a professional company. In this case, you should consult with your insurance provider to find out whether or not you can get any financial assistance towards the repair.

Asphalt Repair Sandy UT

About Sandy, Utah

Located at the base of the Wasatch Mountains thirteen miles (19 km) south of Salt Lake City, Sandy was a likely area for early settlement. The area was first used by nomadic bands of Paiute, Shoshone, and Bannock Indians who roamed along the base of the mountains as they travelled from their winter home at Utah Lake to their summer fishing grounds at Bear Lake.

Permanent settlers first moved into Sandy during the 1860s and 1870s because of the availability of land in the less crowded southern end of the Salt Lake Valley. The original plat was essentially one square mile, situated on an alluvial terrace running north and south along the eastern edge of the Jordan River drainage system and paralleling the mountain range.

The origin of its name has not been established with any certainty. Perhaps most widely believed is that Brigham Young named Sandy for its thirsty soil, but there is no historical evidence for this. Another theory is that the name came from a legendary and colorful Scotsman, Alexander "Sandy" Kinghorn, the engineer who ran the first train line to this end of the Salt Lake Valley. Though this seems bolstered by the original name (Sandy Station or Sandy's Station), historians consider it unlikely in view of the short period between the start of the train service and the first instances of the name.

In 1863, there were only four homes between Union (7200 South) and Dunyon (Point of the Mountain): the Thayne homestead at 6600 South and 800 East, one in Crescent, one at Dunyon, and a fourth outside present-day Sandy boundaries altogether. Within a few years, Thomas Allsop, a Yorkshire farmer who had immigrated to Utah in 1853, owned almost half of present-day Sandy from County Road to Fourth East along Alta Road to Lindell Parkway. LeGrand Young owned the land between Fourth East and State Street.

Farmers willing to try their hand at the thirsty soil that inspired Sandy's name took up land along State Street, which stretched from downtown Salt Lake City to Point of the Mountain. But it was mining that shaped Sandy's first four decades. When silver mining began in Little Cottonwood Canyon, entrepreneurs recognized Sandy's value as a supply station; soon its main street was lined with hotels, saloons, and brothels serving miners ready to spend their newly earned wages. Three major smelters were located in Sandy. They were the Flagstaff, the Mingo, and the Saturn. These made Sandy the territory's most significant smelting center for a number of years.

The railroad was also significant in determining the course of Sandy's history. Built in 1873, the railroad connected Sandy to Salt Lake City and facilitated the transportation of ore and other products both in and out of the area. A streetcar line in 1907 facilitated the transportation of locals to jobs in Salt Lake City; and the automobile later continued to serve that function.

When the mines failed in the 1890s, Sandy faltered, then underwent a significant economic transformation into an agricultural community. The fact that Sandy did not disappear, like so many other mining towns that dwindled with their mother lodes, was due to its location, resources, and the spirit of its inhabitants.

Sandy was incorporated in 1893, largely as part of an effort to combat what Mormon inhabitants considered "unsavory" elements in the town. Due to its mine-based beginnings, Sandy saw some modest growth. After incorporation, it was almost as if Sandy had redefined itself. Gone were the large numbers of single, transient men. By 1900, there was only a handful of saloons and hotels, and Sandy began to more closely resemble other rural Utah towns — a place where everyone knew everyone else. Church, farming, business, and family formed the focus of the inhabitants' world.

This pace and way of life continued for more than six decades, interrupted only by wars, the Great Depression, and the changing seasons. No significant jumps in population, economic trends, or social patterns altered the predictable and stable rhythm of life.

In the late 1960s, however, this rural town dramatically changed course with its second boom. It had always been assumed by local leaders and citizens that Sandy would grow outward from its logical and historic center—the nexus of Main and Center streets. However, population growth overwhelmed the physical center as neighborhoods spread out in every direction over the land.

During the 1970s, pocket communities took shape, providing the services, schools, and shopping traditionally offered by a city. Annexation issues became prominent as Salt Lake County and Sandy vied for control over land and resources. Sandy became a collection of small local communities identified by a youthful, family-oriented population. Although it was initially perceived as a bedroom community, and often still is, it has since developed a thriving commercial center along State Street and other various arterial roads.

In 2014, the Sandy City government revealed blueprints to redevelop 1,100 acres of Sandy's downtown area into a new resort-style city center over the next 25 years, adding high-rise multi-family residential buildings and office towers, while also renovating the Shops at South Town shopping mall. The plans will also add new multi-use trails, the new Hale Center Theatre, and other amenities. The city center project is named The Cairns, with the project stretching between 9000 South and 11400 South, and Interstate 15 to the TRAX Blue Line. The project includes the Rio Tinto Stadium and the South Towne Exposition Center.

The project divides the city center into distinct urban villages; the areas currently under development include:

The master plan also includes study areas for future development and single-use areas that are unlikely to change.

As of February 2017, the first phase of the Shops at South Town redevelopment is complete and the Central Village office towers (including a new InContact headquarters), the Hale Center Theatre, and the Park at City Center residential project are near completion. The East Village transit-oriented development is nearly halfway complete, with residential projects near completion and mixed-use projects planned for a late 2017 or early 2018 groundbreaking. Transit enhancements are planned to connect the TRAX station to the South Jordan FrontRunner station, and create a link between the active villages, by way of rubber-tire bus, trolleybus, or tram. This route has been studied and is currently under planning.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 22.4 square miles (57.9 km2), of which 22.3 square miles (57.8 km2) is land and 0.04 square mile (0.1 km2) (0.09%) is water.

The major residential region of eastern Sandy sits on the slopes of the Wasatch Range while the western section lies at the bottom of the valley. Interstate 15 and State Street (US-89) run through the western portions of the city, while the Jordan River forms part of the western border with West Jordan and South Jordan.

Under the Köppen climate classification, Sandy has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa) or a humid continental climate (Dfa) depending on which variant of the system is used.

According to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2017, there were 96,145 people in Sandy. The racial makeup of the county was 84.6% non-Hispanic White, 0.7% Black, 0.4% Native American, 3.0% Asian, 0.7 Pacific Islander, and 2.1% from two or more races. 8.9% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

The city population remains the sixth largest in Utah as of 2010, there were 87,418 people, 28,296 households, and 22,553 families residing in the city. The race and ethnicity compositions of the city were 90.0% White, 3.0% Asian, 0.7% Black, 0.6% Pacific Islander, 0.5% Native American, 2.6% from other races, and 2.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.4% of the population.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 31.3% at age of 19 and under, 13.3% from 20 to 29, 19.2% from 29 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males. There were 28,296 households, out of which 38.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.1% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.3% were non-families. 15.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.08 and the average family size was 3.45.

The median income for a household in the city was $76,904, and the median income for a family was $84,770. Full-time year-around male workers had a median income of $59,108 versus $40,506 for female workers. The per capita income for the city was $30,952, 7.8% of the population and 6.1% of families were below the poverty line. Of the total population, 11.0% of those under the age 18 and 4.3% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

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